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JULY 2018  |  ISSUE NO. 1
 

Welcome to the inaugural issue of The Scoop!
We're glad to have a way to stay in touch each month and share with you some highlights and happenings, as well as some fun contests.

In this issue, meet John Peterson of Ferndale Market, Nicci Sylvester of TONIC, Lonny and Sandy Dietz of Whitewater Gardens Farm, and more—including a contest challenge that will stretch your word skills!

Enjoy, share, and let us know what you think! 


 

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Exhibitor applications sought for Fifth Annual FEAST! Local Foods Marketplace

Feast logo(June 19, 2018) – The Fifth Annual FEAST! Local Foods Marketplace is now accepting applications for food and beverage businesses from Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota for its event Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 2018, Mayo Civic Center.

FEAST! hosts more than 100 juried exhibitors who utilize locally grown ingredients when possible and operate at or near a distributor-ready scale. Exhibitors show, sample and sell their artisan food products to wholesale buyers and consumers during the two-day event. They also participate in a Friday tradeshow with networking and workshop sessions. (2017 exhibitors here).

FEAST! 2018 brings new opportunities for engagement, including a Virtual Pitch Experience and more interaction with wholesale buyers during the Friday tradeshow. FEAST! Restaurant Week returns, with local restaurants featuring FEAST! vendor products. The Saturday festival will once again invite the public to pick their favorite for the People’s Choice Award. Three new award categories, focusing on innovation, social benefit and booths/displays, have been added for 2018.

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The marriage of maple and oak: fall in love with B & E’s Bourbon Barrel Aged Maple Syrup

by Elena Byrne

 

With the recent release of their Vintage 2017 batch of bourbon barrel-aged maple syrup, Bree Breckel and Eric Weninger have hit their stride. It’s their third batch, and they’ve gathered resources, earned fans, and created crazy demand.  

"Folks are eating - or drinking it- faster than we can fill the bottles!" says Bree.

B & E’s Trees has risen to regional fame with their inventive collaboration, combining the luxury of pure maple syrup with the decadence of bourbon. Their secret is to age the maple syrup in barrels formerly used to age bourbon which creates a precious sweetness. The symphony of maple and oak is an inspiration that belies the imagination—no longer just for pancakes, you’re motivated to go full out and do waffles. Or better yet, use it to add nuance and depth to countless other savory concoctions and delightful mixed drinks.

Bree and Eric started mapling by selling bulk to Maple Valley Co-op, with both working off-farm jobs to support their maple habit.  Then in 2013 a good friend connected them with Central Waters Brewing Co., and a plot of deliciousness was hatched.  Central Waters would source fresh Bourbon Barrels, B&E would use them to age their maple syrup, and then the maple soaked barrels would return to the brewery to age their Maple Barrel Stout.  

The initial batch of Bourbon Barrel Aged Maple Syrup hit shelves in the Autumn of 2015, and an extremely limited release of the Maple Barrel Stout was launched at the brewery in April 2017.

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Kids join the local food fun at the Feast! fest

by Elena Byrne

 

Partnering this year with the Minnesota Children’s Museum Rochester, the Feast! Local Foods Marketplace festival planning team is happy to bring some new family-interactive fun to the festival’s Children’s Area. 

The Feast! mission involves connecting people with their food, so it’s fitting to feature the Farmers’ Market and Garden exhibits.

As seen in the museum pictures here, there’s lots of potential hands-on play for ages 3-8 to enjoy with parents and others. Kids can identify the veggies and load them into shopping baskets at the market, and plant “veggie” markers in the fabric rows of the garden.

For making it come to life on another level, the Museum’s play farm truck will be great for climbing on, loading up and hopefully, making some “vroom, vroom” sounds!

Also on loan from the Museum will be their (almost) life-sized Holstein cow model, another great way to keep farms in our hearts and minds. We won’t be surprised to see some grown-up kids sneaking in some photo ops! (It might be a perfect selfie station for those so inclined!)

Along with this partnership, all Minnesota Children’s Museum Rochester members can show their membership card at the festival entrance to get free youth admissions with any paid adult ticket. Also, the Museum will be handing out 2-for-1 general admission coupons in the week leading up to Feast!

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Health and flavor to grab and go!

by Kelli Wickard

 

What mom wants their child to eat an unhealthy breakfast? Not Sue Kakuk, founder of Kakookies!

When Sue found out that her daughter and her daughter’s friends were eating donuts before their collegiate cycling races, she took it upon herself to find a way to give nutritious breakfast on their big race days. Not only was it important to give her daughter a healthy breakfast, but also to provide something that was  convenient, individually wrapped and would fit easily in the back pockets of her daughter’s cycling jerseys. Sue started baking cookies and Kakookies was born.

        When she first started baking the cookies, Sue wanted to accommodate for needs of many people with dietary restrictions, so she began by substituting typical cookie ingredients for healthier alternatives, baking regular, gluten free, and vegan cookies. To her surprise, most people, vegan or not, chose to purchase the vegan cookie over any of the others. She took that information and ran with it. She said goodbye to the flour, dairy and eggs and added no other substitutes for these missing ingredients. Now, all of her cookies are completely vegan.

 

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WW Homestead Dairy now offers wonderful hot and cold treats!

farm baby
"This little red head is excited for Fresh Curd Friday!" WW Homestead Dairy wrote on their Facebook page on October 20, 2017. 

by Kelli Boylen

 

In July 2017 WW Homestead Dairy, Waukon, Iowa, added the "Coffee Barn" to their existing retail store and ice cream parlor.

“There were no specialty coffee shops in Waukon and we felt that it would be a great complement to our ice cream parlor,” says Liz Murphy of WW Homestead Dairy.  “It also allows us to feature our milk and some great locally roasted coffees. Currently, we serve Verena Street Coffee out of Dubuque, Iowa and Impact Coffee out of Decorah, Iowa.”

In addition to their delicious ice cream, cheese, butter and milk, they now offer a full line of espresso drinks, fresh brewed coffee, tea, and seasonal options such as hot apple cider and hot chocolate made with their own chocolate milk.  

“The response has been great from the community and visitors passing through,” Liz says.

WW Homestead Dairy is a family-run dairy processing plant operated by the Walleser and Weighner families. They  began producing their first cheese curds the summer of 2011 and has since adopted the title of “The Cheese Curd Capital of Iowa.” All the milk used to produce their dairy products comes from the Walleser and Weighner family dairy farms, located in Allamakee County.

This past year they expanded their markets by working with colleges and schools, and are currently working on introducing cottage cheese into their product line.

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Wisconsin business helps spice up family cooking with Indian flavors

by Elena Byrne

 

If you’re like me, you’ve dabbled a bit in the arena of Indian cooking, but let’s face it: it’s always daunting. It never seems quite as delectable as when experienced hands have made it, right? Perhaps it’s the fact that you may substitute a spice here and there, or skip a spice altogether because you couldn’t find it, or maybe it’s because the spices are old, having sat in the cupboard for a year.

Sara & ParthaThat’s exactly why Flavor Temptations was created. Sara Parthasarathy first created the pre-measured meal kits because it pained her to know that her son, in college, was not cooking for himself. Now she works to help families cook together using her fresh spice packages along with ingredients you have on hand such as potatoes, canned chickpeas, and veggies of your choice. The step-by-step recipes are easy to follow and the results have been bringing customers back for more.

 

Flavor Boom

Sara and husband Partha have been growing their business since 2012 and they’ve come a long way, now in their second rented commercial kitchen where they measure and package their spices. They’re in their second round of packaging and have adapted the recipes now for institutional-size packs as well as the 2- and 4-serving retail packs.

They first attended the Feast! Local Foods Marketplace in 2016, where they were poised to grow and added two distributors as a result. Prior to Feast 2016 their recipe kits were in 28 stores, and a month following Feast they were in 60 stores.

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Local Support – The Ultimate Key to Success

By Kelli Wickard

Rainbow Food Co-opBefore you go to Walmart, Target, or any other big-box store, think about the impact of your purchases—think about helping your city grow.

Small businesses are the backbone of our local economy, and it’s important that we support them and inform people that they are there. An example of a small business that survives off of the support of the community is a food co-op. The initial reason that food co-ops were formed was for the community to have access to healthy, fresh and delicious food with less environmental impact and reduced waste. Co-ops are able to interact with the community and build strong relationships with the member-owners and customers that frequent the store.

The Rainbow Food Co-op, located in small-town Blue Earth, Minn., is an example of this type of business. In a city with only 3,211 people, it is crucial that their locals are supporting the store in order for it to be kept afloat. “Our customer base is extremely loyal,” stated Connie Johannsen, assistant manager and board secretary. “Many customers have been shopping here for years and now the next generation of the family is carrying out the tradition.”

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Country View partnering with Food Bank—even more people enjoy their yogurt!

by Kelli Boylen

 

Country View Dairy is not only consistently gaining new customers, they are also now helping to feed the hungry in Northeast Iowa.

County View provides yogurt to the Northeast Iowa Food Bank in Waterloo that is sent out weekly to the 16 counties they serve in Northeast Iowa. Their partnership with the Food Bank ensures a fresh, continuous supply of yogurt to many people who may not otherwise have a source of this nutrient-filled food. Country View provides the yogurt to the food bank at the lowest price possible, just slightly above cost.

They also donate additional yogurt to food pantries if it is getting too close to the expiration date to send out for retail sale.

“Country View products are now available in more than 120 stores in seven states, 20 public schools, 11 colleges, several health care institutions and restaurants,” says Bob Howard, director of marketing and sales. “And it’s available to Google Headquarters and the O’Hare Airport.”

He added, “We are also expanding markets into Wisconsin, concentrating on Madison and Milwaukee. That is new for us in the last year. Another small yogurt producer went out of business there and we have been able to step in and fill that niche of artisan small batch farmstead yogurt for many of their former customers.”

In Rochester, Country View yogurt can be found for purchase at People's Food Co-op, and as an ingredient at both Nupa locations and Tonic Local Kitchen & Juice Bar.

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O'Brien's Own Granola fueling athletes, students at U of I

by Kelli Boylen

 

University of Iowa athletes are now powering up with O’Brien’s Own Granola!Obriens display

O’Brien’s Own Granola received a vendor contract from the University of Iowa Athletic Department to provide new, single serving 2-ounce bags of granola. In addition, their energy bars are now offered at the fueling stations across campus.

“What a treat that our granola is helping fuel our student athletes at the University of Iowa. We feel privileged that we are a part of their training routines!” said Rick O’Brien.

In 2010, Rick and Belinda O’Brien started making granola with an original recipe in their own kitchen for themselves. They were soon making it for family, friends and co-workers.

In early 2011, they decided to go retail but needed a commercial manufacturing kitchen so Rick converted their basement into what they needed. After only a year they outgrew that space and in October of 2012 moved production into a commercial facility.

“It’s amazing how far we have come by keeping things simple. We use only the finest ingredients with no preservatives and trade shows like Feast! and local farmer’s markets have been a huge blessing and a catalyst for our growth,” shared Rick and Belinda. All their oats and honey are locally sourced from Iowa.

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